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Future-Ready Classroom Design: From Concept to Classroom

The Design of a Future-Ready Classroom

Despite massive changes in 21st century technology and lifestyle, student-centered teaching and pedagogy evolution, K-12 classrooms today look and operate much the same as they did in the prior century. Teacher-centric, row and column classroom structure, and associated furniture types, still widely dominate, mirroring the oratory-based ideologies of over 4,000 years ago. Future-ready classroom design is now ready to move from concept to the classroom.

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Campus Residence Hall Renovations: What’s Old is New Again

High Ed White Paper Web Header 1818x782 Decreased funding, slowing enrollment, overwhelming student debt, and higher operating costs are just some of the challenges facing higher education. Now we must also take into consideration all of the realities that will shake out on campuses following a pandemic. Recruiting and retaining students is vital. Campus housing is a valuable marketing tool to attract students and keep them living on campus.  Residence hall renovations preserve campus character and eliminate costly additional land development. These critical campus updates also convert existing housing into a valuable asset while promoting sustainability. Continue reading

SEEING IS BELIEVING: The Power of Design Renderings to Share Your Story

The advent of Building Information Modelling (BIM) has opened a whole new range of possibilities for three-dimensional digital design renderings. Not so long ago, when we wanted to share a new building or renovation design concept with our clients (and often their clients), the options were limited.  We could either provide a hand sketch or three-dimensional physical building model, using clay, paper, foamcore, wood or other materials.  The result was often beautiful and effective for sharing the project vision. But it was also time consuming, static and, relatively speaking, a costly added expense.  These realities limited the use of these methodologies. Continue reading

BACK TO SCHOOL: Design for In-Person Learning During a Pandemic

This fall, millions of K-12 and college students headed back to school amid the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Determining best practices for navigating this return has been challenging for administrators, teachers, students, and families alike.  Design for in-person learning during a pandemic requires both flexibility and creativity. To that end, a number of manufacturers have developed innovative furniture and other classroom products to help K-12 school, colleges and universities quickly adapt to changing conditions and social distancing needs.

Our team does not endorse any one product or manufacturer. The following is an overview of some of the products we have found while helping our clients review available options.  Many of these offer benefits not only for today’s continually evolving safety priorities, but also for adaptable learning spaces beyond the current pandemic realities.

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Creative Opportunities for Growth: University-Based Retirement Communities

University Based Retirement Communities provide creative opportunities for mutual growth

There has been a lot of buzz around University-Based Retirement Communities (UBRCs). Even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, industry experts have predicted a rise in their number as both higher ed and senior living seek creative strategies for future vitality.

Downward trends in on-campus enrollment and revenue can be partially attributed to a declining cohort of college-age population.  At the same time there has been a well-documented rise in baby boomers reaching retirement age and thus increasing demand for senior housing options.  However, both groups have faced greater competition whether from similar organizations or increasingly by home-based alternatives that technology has made possible. Continue reading

3 Reasons Interior Designer Credentialing Matters

various images of interior spaces Interior designer credentialing reflects a commitment to the highest professional standards.  Our firm focuses on senior living and educational facilities. Interior designers must put the health, safety and welfare of the people living, learning and working in those spaces at the forefront of design decisions. As we look forward to a post-COVID future, physical space impacts on health and well-being take on increased significance.

Starting with the Basics:  Interior Design Professionals

Although sometimes used interchangeably with interior decorating, the interior design profession requires specialized education and training.  Interior design professionals typically earn a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in interior design and/or architecture, have worked in the field for two or more years, and hold National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) certification.  The current exam encompasses seven core competencies of interior design: building systems, codes, construction standards, contract administration, design application, professional practice and project coordination. The NCIDQ examination is regularly updated to reflect current knowledge required to design safe, functional and innovative interior spaces. Continue reading

Biophilic Design for Learning

a collage of various biophilic design samples in the real world Despite the documented benefits of getting outside and experiencing nature firsthand, students spend most of the day indoors and a growing proportion of that time is spent staring at a computer screen.  This reality reinforces the value of applying biophilic design principles to a new school building or campus renovation to create a better learning environment for students.

Open Air School, Netherlands, 1918
Open Air School, Netherlands, 1918 – The health benefits of nature connections have long been appreciated. Open air schools originated in the early 1900s in response to tuberculous outbreaks. The first open air school in the US opened in 1908 in Providence, Rhode Island.

Biophilic Design Defined

Biophilic design has received growing attention in recent years. The idea that nature connections help to inspire, calm and nurture us almost seems like common sense. Biologist Edward O. Wilson, who literally wrote the book “Biophilia,” describes our innate tendency to affiliate with nature.

Biophilic design acknowledges this reality and focuses on strategies to increase occupant connections to the natural environment. This is achieved through a combination of direct connections, simulated nature, and space and place conditions. Continue reading

Digging into the Details

collage of interior design details When we think about interior design, we tend to focus on the visual aspects.  Magazines, home improvement shows and retailers highlight “wow” spaces, focusing on the final touches and products deemed essential for beautiful results.  Other aspects such as functionality, comfort, ergonomics, health or safety, are often an afterthought, if we consider them at all. Continue reading

BACK TO SCHOOL AND BEYOND: Interior Design Meets Technology

Technology Cover Graphic As students head back to the classroom, tablets, laptops and even smartphones are increasingly among the learning tools at their disposal. And it’s not just students who expect technology to be available at their fingertips. In today’s world, technology accommodations—recharging stations integrated into the bedside lamp in our hotel room, table ordering systems at our local restaurant and WiFi hot spots just about anywhere we go—are commonplace. From space planning and programming to lighting and furniture selections, interior design solutions must include considerations for remaining connected comfortably, easily and without compromising style.

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