Projects

Franklin & Marshall College – SAGA Office

Lancaster, PA

The Sexuality and Gender Alliance (SAGA) student organization moved to a more prominent campus location. Interior renovations to the new space included furniture and finishes to create a flexible collaborative space for meetings and hanging out while also reflecting the mission of this student organization.

Franklin & Marshall College – Schnader Hall

Lancaster, PA

Continuing previous phases of residence hall renovations, the renovations to Schnader Hall were completed during the students’ summer break. The lobby, study lounges, restrooms, corridors, and resident rooms all received a refresh in this condensed renovation schedule. Bathrooms now have a shared sink area, but separate private toilet and shower areas in response to student requests.

Fig & Barrel Pub

The owners had simple criteria for their new pub space:  “it had to be old, it had to be authentic and it had to have history.”  Located in the Historical Architectural Review Board (HARB) district for the City of York, the 110-year old building had beautiful, original brick walls. The existing brick was one of the many features we highlighted in this building fit-out to create a uniquely distinctive pub venue that respects its community roots.   We added a tall fireplace feature, introduced a mix of booth seating and high top tables and used bold colors that complement the existing brick for a warm, industrial aesthetic.  Lighting selections reinforce the contemporary industrial style. The new production kitchen includes a wood fired oven, but the main attraction is the bar, which features a floor to ceiling display of whiskey and other spirits from around the world.  A rolling, library style ladder allows the bartender to put on a show while serving libations.

Photo Credit:  Matthew Tennison Photography

Barley Snyder Offices

Interior updates for this thriving law practice focused primarily on the top two floors of work spaces, including the third floor paralegal and attorney’s offices, as well as a library and lounge area.  The project also involved updates to the first floor annex hospitality serving area and conversion of an office to a small conference room. Exposed brick walls and other distinctive historical elements were maintained for the updates.

This unique office setting was the site of additions and renovations previously designed by RLPS, resulting in the current three bay, three-story façade. The building face blends traditional and contemporary elements in its use of materials, scale and context with surrounding buildings.  Handmade oversized brick with grapevine mortar joints respects the adjacent historical structures. The bronze mirrored glass on the modern annex addition literally reflects a noteworthy Second Empire structure across the street.

Photo Credit:  Nathan Cox Photography

Rooster Woodshop

Elizabethtown, PA

The Rooster Woodshop replaced a smaller shop that was housed in a renovated chicken house. Located within the Masonic Village community, the new 8,000 square foot building consists of shop space, a receiving area, a finishing zone and showroom.  The Rooster Woodshop is fully appointed with professional woodworking equipment, a commercial dust collection system with pneumatic hose reels, an industrial finish booth and access control.

The wood-framed building, clad in a combination of stained cedar shiplap siding, cedar shakes and vertical metal siding, features a standing seam metal roof and aluminum-clad wood windows and doors. Sliding barn doors segment work areas and control access. The simplistic form is complemented by quality, local materials combined to create a contemporary farm-style structure that is as aesthetically appealing as it is functional.

Constructed on top of an old barn foundation on a rural site, the simple building form perches on a ridge along a country drive. Viewed through a sparse row of trees, the wood shop looks as though it was meant to be there, now as much a part of that hill as the trees.

Awards:  Award of Merit and Member’s Choice Award, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Central Pennsylvania; Merit Award and Publication in Environments for Aging Design Showcase

Photographer:  Nathan Cox Photography

Simon Lever Offices

Lancaster, PA

A revamped floor plan and interior renovations updated an existing building for Simon Lever’s office relocation. Nearly double the size of its former space, the 25,100 square foot renovation resulted in more open office workspaces and collaboration areas including conference rooms and a large multipurpose room and bistro area for employee use as well as hosting seminars and conferences. The distinctive, contemporary color scheme reflects the company brand and is complemented by unique features including bold wall graphics that coincide with the firm’s mission and values.

Simon Lever is an accounting and advisory firm, currently employing 56 advisors, accountants, and support professionals, which has been recognized as one of the top 10 places to work in Pennsylvania.

Photo Credit: Nathan Cox Photography

St. Vincent’s Seminary

Philadelphia, PA

Interior renovations to a skilled nursing residence for retired priests focused on updating the existing spaces to provide a better quality of life in a comfortable, appealing setting. We updated the existing modern design aesthetic with contemporary finishes while eliminating many of the institutional features that made the living spaces feel like a hospital.

Built-in bookshelves were added to resident rooms and the addition of a full accessible shower with half wall supports resident dignity and privacy. The biggest change was replacing the central nursing “command station” with a new living room that focuses attention on a distinctive fireplace feature rather than staff areas which are now tucked behind the scenes.

Photo Credit:  Nathan Cox Photography

Franklin & Marshall College – Ben Franklin South Residence Hall

Lancaster, PA

The interior refresh of this residence hall was completed during the 11 week, summer break. Working inside the constraints of the existing space, study lounges, corridors, and over 100 resident rooms received new furniture and finishes. Excessive corridor doorways were removed for a more open and unified residential space. Special considerations were made to add gender neutral ADA accessible bathrooms. Subsequent interior refreshes continue in additional housing during summer breaks.

 

Photo Credit: Larry Lefever Photography

Martins Run

Media, PA

To address the common challenges of aging stock and increasing vacancies, this provider chose to incrementally reinvent its apartments. Pocket doors, low-E windows and a myriad of other design details make the “not-so-big” units more appealing, senior-friendly and energy efficient. Exterior vertical mechanical units replace existing wall console units to allow for four-panel patio doors for more light and outdoor views. Removing interior walls from the galley kitchen creates an open floor plan that belies the small unit sizes. Although no new square footage was added, the transformation crates spacious, well-conceived residences that have been an unparalleled marketing success.

Awards: Exhibition and Publication in the AIA/LeadingAge Design for Aging Review

 

Photo Credit: Larry Lefever Photography

Sarah A. Todd Memorial Home, United Church of Christ Homes

Carlisle, PA

The existing medical model, memory care neighborhood was renovated to create inviting, person-centered living spaces for nursing residents with dementia. This total transformation was accomplished within the constraints of the existing neighborhood through carefully phased, incremental renovations, allowing the provider to maintain occupancy throughout. The nursing station was relocated to a more central location for improved efficiency, but more importantly, to free up its former brightly-lit space at the end of the corridor for a new family room which leads into a secure courtyard. A serving kitchen and nourishment station were added to enable staff members to accommodate resident preferences.

 

Photo Credit: Larry Lefever Photography